Tags

, , , , ,

Welcome to another chapter of sidekick reviews. As far as my story goes, I have always been a voracious reader, until about my freshman year of college. I sort of took a break that year from my own reading because I was so swamped with school reading. But when I picked up some free reading books again that next summer, I went right back to what I know–Young Adult and Middle Grade literature. Since I haven’t been in school for the last three years, I’ve consumed A LOT of books. That’ s mostly what these Sidekick Reviews will be: books I’ve read within the last year or so and want to share with you.

Up this week
[Each image will link you to the book’s Goodreads’ page]

Delirium by Lauren Oliver


"Before Scientists found the cure, 
people thought love was a good thing.
They didn't understand that once love--
the deliria--looms in your blood, there
is no escaping its hold. Things are 
different now. Scientists are able to 
eradicate love, and the government
demands that all citizens revive the 
cure upon turning eighteen. Lena 
Holoway has always looked forward to 
the day when she'll be cured. A life
without love is a life without pain:
safe, measured, predictable, and happy.

But with ninety-five days left until 
her treatment, Leno does the 
unthinkable: she falls in love."

source: Goodreads synopsis

Review: I originally picked up Delirium because I was smack dab in the middle of the dystopian hype after coming out of reading The Hunger Games. This is the first in a trilogy series–the second, Pandemonium, was published earlier this year. The novel definitely fed my need to fall into another world. Oliver has a really interesting story going with love being a disease and all, but for those that like romance, don’t think she leaves that out.
I really liked the story… but I wanted more in this first novel. This is one of those where I think the continuation of the series is just going to get better.
If you enjoy the genre, you won’t want to miss out on the series. You might even take a look back on your own teenage love life.
Published: February 1st, 2011
Age Group | Genre: YA| Dystopia

Wither by Lauren DeStefano

"By age sixteen, Rhine Ellery has four
years left to live. She can thank
modern science for this genetic time
bomb: a botched effort to create a 
perfect race has left all males with a
lifespan of 25 years and females with 
20 years. Geneticists are seeking a
miracle antidote to restore the
human race, desperate orphans crowd
the population, crime and poverty have
skyrocketed, and young girls are being 
kidnapped and sold as polygamous brides
to bear more children.

When Rhine is kidnapped and sold as a
bride, she vows to do all she can to 
escape."

Source: Goodreads' synopsis

Review: Alright, maybe I’m just so disappointed in this dystopian novel because The Hunger Games was so good and the whole world of dystopia/science fiction is new to me. I did like Wither–enough  to read the second in the trilogy Fever released this year and I’m actually anxious for the final novel next year–but it definitely isn’t my favorite, and I probably won’t recommend it to teens. Firstly, there are mature issues in the novel, namely sex. We never actually see a scene played out, but it’s there and talked about often. Granted, they are married couples, but the whole idea behind Wither is just weird: polygamy is legalized to save the human race. Honestly, that’s why I picked up the series.
I was intrigued by the world and ideas that Stefano had created, but that was about it. The storyline is interesting, but I sort of felt cheated with this one. I felt as if there wasn’t much depth to the novel, and the writing was so-so. It isn’t an action driven story by any means, and I just needed more from the characters.
Again, if you are really into the dystopian genre and/or are looking for something different, you might pick up this read. It does make you think about the world we live in, just not one to stock my shelf with.
Published: March 22nd, 2011
Age Group | Genre: YA| Dystopia, Romance

Hopeful Reading!

Advertisements