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CN-003

Is a weekly feature here at The Hopeful Heroine where I give short and sweet reviews of books I’ve read. I don’t always have the time to sit down and do a full review for every book I read, but I still want to share my thoughts! Plus, many of these reviews are of books I read prior to staring up the blog and wish to share with you!

Up this week
[Each image will link you to the book’s Goodreads’ page]

Matched by Ally Condie

"Cassia has always trusted the Society
to make the right choices for her:
what to read, what to watch, what to
believe. So when Xander's face appears
on-screen at her Matching ceremony,
Cassia knows with complete certainty 
that he is her ideal mate...until she
sees Ky Markham's face flash for an 
instant before the screen fades to 
black.
The Society tells her it is a glitch,
a rare malfunction, and that she should
focus on the happy life she's destined
to lead with Xander. But Cassia can't 
stop thinking about Ky, and as they 
slowly fall in love, Cassia begins to 
doubt the Society's infallibility and 
is faced with an impossible choice: 
between Xander and Ky, between
the only life she's known and a path 
that no one else has dared to follow."
source: Goodreads synopsis

Review: Out of all the dystopian literature I have read over the last eighteen months, the Matched series is one of my favorites.  This was such a different novel than Hunger Games or Divergent–there isn’t a lot of action but the Society and dystopian elements were so intriguing! I think I enjoyed this first book in the trilogy so much because it is very reminiscent of The Giver (my review) which is my favorite dystopian/sci-fi novel EVER.
I also very much enjoyed how Matched was a romance novel, and the whole concept behind life in the Society. Honestly, there were so many elements in this Society that reminded me of the way our society is going–freaky! Plus, Condie uses classic poetry as inspiration for the rebellion and other plot elements which gives the novel depth. It’s definitely a dystopian novel that makes you think, and lots of conversation can be pulled out of the pages. Highly recommended for fun reading or even classroom teaching!
Published | Publisher: November 30th,  2010 | Dutton Juvenile
Pages: 369
Age Group | Genre: YA | Dystopian, Sci-Fi, Romance

Frindle by Andrew Clements

"In search of a future that may not 
exist and faced with the decision of
who to share it with, Cassia journeys
to the Outer Provinces in pursuit of
Ky--taken by the Society to his certain
death--only to find that he has escaped,
leaving a series of clues in his wake. 
Cassia's quest leads her to question
much of what she holds dear, even as she
finds glimmers of a different life 
across the border. But as Cassia nears
resolve and certainty about her future
with Ky, an invitation for rebellion, 
an unexpected betrayal, and a surprise 
visit from Xander--who may hold the key 
to the uprising and, still, Cassia's 
heart--change the game once again.
Nothing is as expected on the edge of 
Society, where crosses and double 
crosses make the path more twisted
that ever."
Source: Goodreads' synopsis

Review: Sadly, I felt that Crossed didn’t quite live up to Matched. I felt it had the typical second-book-in-a-trilogy-syndrome—> placeholder. I was often distracted from the plot because it seemed filled with a lot of action that was just moving the book along. I found myself confused at times, and at other times simply asking, “why is this needed again?”  Don’t get me wrong, I still enjoyed it and I recommend it… it just didn’t live up to the expectation I had. However, I really did enjoy getting Ky’s perspective this time and the use of double POV. Crossed also got into the biological/scienc-y part of the plot more, and even though I’m not a science nerd, I found it interesting. I do recommend this book for a good read but beware… the ending will leave you hanging!
Published | Publisher: November 1st, 2011 | Dutton Juvenile
Pages: 367
Age Group | Genre: YA | Dystopian, Sci-fi, Romance

3 rating

Hopeful Reading!

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